The guide to café-hopping in Cameron Highlands

One thing that one can never miss while scrolling through their Instagram is a whole string of photos of food, cozy environment and beautiful cafés that people are visiting. As far as I can remember, cafes weren’t really popular, until maybe two or three years ago and has become such a huge culture here in Malaysia.

With so many cafés sprouting like mushrooms after a heavy downpour, café hopping has become a normal weekend activity that Malaysians really love. In Cameron Highlands, there are some cafés worthy to be hopped up in the mountains. Check these out:

Lord’s Café

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This quaint little café located along Jalan Besar in Tanah Rata is the perfect place for your afternoon tea with the most delicious and sumptuous scones around. Fresh out of the oven, you can either pick their signature Strawberry scones or the normal, butter one. If you are a cake person, they do not disappoint in their variety of cakes, pastries and pancakes. Serving also local English and other varieties of teas, Lord’s Café is the best place for your evening siesta.

Address: No 4, 1st Floor, Jalan Besar, Tanah Rata.

 

The Barracks Café

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Located in Tanah Rata at the edge of the town, Barracks Café is actually a real military barrack that was built during the World War II by the British. Their menu has an extensive mouthwatering dishes which includes pasta, salad, rice dishes as well as a wide selection of cakes and pastries. You can also enjoy your afternoon tea in their beautiful garden, just like how it was done years ago.

Address: No 1, Jalan Gereja, Tanah Rata.

 

Fruit Delights Café

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If you are into fruits, then this café is dedicated specially for you. Just like what its name indicates, Fruit Delights Café offers fresh fruit juice of every kind, and varieties of teas. They have put together an impressive selection of fruit desserts like strawberry ice- cream, raspberry cheese cake, durian cake, mango milkshake, and many more. They also offer local food like pineapple rice, pineapple curry rice, steamboat and fresh fruits. This place is a total delight!

Address: 27 Jalan Besar, Tanah Rata.

 

Teh Tarik Place

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This café is located at Cameron Square in Brinchang. They serve Malaysia’s renowned street food like Teh Tarik, crispy hand-tossed Roti Canai, Nasi Kerabu, Nasi Lemak and Mee Goreng Mamak. If you can’t live without Teh Tarik for a day, this place is a must visit.

Address: Ground Floor, Cameron Square, Brinchang.

 

Tea’Ria Cafe @ Boh Tea Center

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A definite must on the list of cafe-hopping in Cameron Highlands is a visit to Sungei Palas Boh Tea Cafe, also known as Tea’Ria. Tea’Ria offers their own varieties of teas that exude refinement by infusing exotic spice and fruit flavours with tea’s own aroma. You can enjoy your blissful cup of tea while enjoying the fresh air overlooking the tea plantation.

Address: Sg Palas Boh Tea Center, Brinchang.

Now that I have covered some of the best place for café-hopping in Cameron Highlands, here are also some great hotels where you can unwind and relax after your blissful-strawberry filled evening.

Copthorne Cameron Highlands – Staying here, you are waking up to cool mountain air and lush greenery. A 4-star hotel, Copthorne Cameron Highlands offer a choice of 341 full-service guest rooms and apartments, all furnished with modern amenities.

Cameron Highland ResortCameron Highlands Resort is built as a long extension from an existing 1930s cottage with architecture dating from the 1070s. The thing that draws people to this hotel lies in the interiors that dates back to its grand colonial heritage with tall French doors, timber-beamed ceilings and plantation shutters.

For the best deals in town when it comes to hotels, get it straight through Traveloka.

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Stolperstein; a growing memorial

One of the little things that captured my attention when travelling—stolperstein.

A stolperstein or stumbling stone, is a concrete cube bearing a brass plate inscribed with the name and life dates of victims of Nazi extermination. The stolperstein art project was initiated by the German artist Gunter Demnig in 1992, and is still ongoing. It aims at commemorating individual persons at exactly the last place of residency—or, sometimes, work—which was freely chosen by the person before he or she fell victim to Nazi terror, euthanasia, eugenics, was deported to a concentration or extermination camp, or escaped persecution by emigration or suicide. As of 11 January 2015, over 50,000 plates have been laid in 18 European countries, making the stolperstein project the world’s largest decentralised memorial.

Read more here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stolperstein

st01Siesmayerstraße, Frankfurt.

st02Bahnhofstraße, Wiesbaden.

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2017 Calendar pre-order

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My 2017 Calendar is now ready for pre-order. RM50 – Peninsular, RM55 – East M’sia (including postage). Bulk pre-order also available at discounted rate for companies/bookshops. Payment must be made in advance.

One-sided page printing, you can cut and frame each artwork.

Spec:
. Wire-o binding with hook (it’s a hanging calendar)
. Size: 16.5 x 29.7cm
. Full colour (one-sided print)

Please take note that closing date for pre-order: 15 November 2016. The calendar will be sent for printing after the closing date and will only be ready by end November. Delivery will be made early December.

E-mail emilayusof@gmail.com to order.

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Caravaggio’s Heirs – Baroque in Naples

I took the chance to visit Caravaggio’s Heirs – Baroque in Naples that is on exhibit at Museum Wiesbaden, Wiesbaden (capital of Hessen) on my 2nd last day in Frankfurt with Daiana and my sister-in-law, Najwa.

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The exhibition is from 14 October 2016 until 12 February 2017. If you are somewhere in the Hessen, do visit the exhibition. From Frankfurt, it is about 40 minutes train ride to Wiesbaden. Fare is €16. Museum ticket fee is €10.

Caravaggio’s Heirs – Baroque in Naples brings flourishing Golden Age of Italian paintings that began in 1606 with the arrival of Caravaggio in Naples. During the next decade, Caravaggio became a much-admired model for generations of Neopolitan Baroque artists such as Giovanni Battista Caracciolo, Artemisia Gentileschi, Jusepe de Ribera, Salvator Rosa, Mattia Preti, Luca Giordano and Francesco Solimena.

Presenting more than 200 works by some 50 artists from as many lenders in eleven countries, the exhibition traces the development of Neapolitan Baroque painting.

Who is Caravaggio?

Michelangelo Merisi (Michael Angelo Merigi or Amerighi) da Caravaggio (29 September 1571 – 18 July 1610) was active in Rome, Naples, Malta, and Sicily. His paintings, which combine a realistic observation of the human state, both physical and emotional, with a dramatic use of lighting (reminds me of Rembrandt), had a formative influence on Baroque painting.

Caravaggio was contracted for many works, including the work in the Contarelli Chapel, which was in the Church of San Luigi dei Francesi. Following this commission, he was later given several contracts to do work throughout several chapels in Rome, as well as in neighbouring cities. For the most part, these new paintings, and each new job he took, helped to increase the fame which he was experiencing during the time.

However, there were a few of his pieces that were rejected because of the dramatic intensity, which people viewed as vulgar. Some of his well-known for during this period include The Madonna of the Grooms, and the Death of the Virgin.

Judith and Holofernes

Two paintings from the Caravagesques that are most intriguing to me were Judith Slaying Holofernes by Artemisia Gentileschi and Judith Beheading Holofernes by Caravaggio. Caravaggio’s painting, was the main inspiration of Artemisia’s. Both have the same Holofernes, but different interpretation of Judith, and different accomplice. The lighting differs too; I imagine that Artemisia’s lighting effect came from a lamp, while Caravaggio’s from the day light that went through a window. Different feeling.

Anyway, Caravaggio’s Judith reminds me of Boticelli’s Simonetta. That nose. That face.

judith-und-holofernesJudith Slaying Holofernes (1614–20). Oil on canvas. By Artemisia Gentileschi.

judith-beheading-holofernesJudith Beheading Holofernes by Caravaggio. Created: circa 1598-1599.

Artemisia Gentileschi

Artemisia Gentileschi painted many pictures of strong and suffering women from myth and the Bible – victims, suicides, warriors. Artemisia was raped by a painter that her father hired to tutor her. The trauma of the rape and trial impacted on Artemisia’s painting. Her graphic depictions were cathartic and symbolic attempts to deal with her pain. Her style was heavily influenced by Caravaggio.

Here are some photos from the exhibition:

riberaImmaculate Conception, Jusepe de Ribera. My most favourite piece of Caravagesques.

beinaschiDiogenes by Giovanni Battista Benaschi (1636–1688). I was attracted by the metal frame first, painting then. Two perfect masterpieces.

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